Trianing – HOS – Two Day Trips – 10 Consecutive Hours Off-Duty

Leave a comment

Make sure your drivers are trained to keep their Hours of Service logs up to-date and understand how to stay in compliance with 10 off duty – not more than 11 hrs driving – not more than 14 hrs on duty..

If the HOS Log is being kept up to-date, the driver will recognize the 10 consecutive hour off-duty problem ahead of time and contact the company for alternate plans to stay in compliance and an alert, safe driver.

Remember: Fatigue is the killer, not the the HOS regulations.

Don’t let this happen to you.10hoursexampleoffduty-thumb.jpg

Purpose and Assumptions

3 Comments

‘Dotfleets’ Purpose:

  • To help the employer who “shall be knowledgeable of and comply with all regulations contained in this subchapter which are applicable to that motor carrier’s operation”.(~390.3(e)(1))
  • To help the driver who “shall be instructed regarding, and shall comply with all applicable regulations contained in this subchapter”. (~395.3(e) (2)
  • This site designed to help . . . More

Carriers 101 on Coercion

Leave a comment

When a D.O.T. auditor shows up to investigate about a driver you had or have, and they discover you scheduling required him to break FMCSA regulations . . . the driver may not be the one on the hot seat.  When the auditor asks for your explanation . . .
  • I thought it was ok . . .

  • We’ve always done it this way. . .

  • No one ever told me . . .

  • I fired him because he wouldn’t do his scheduled route in time . . .

and other variations on a carrier’s  “its-not-my-fault” explanation will not fly when the ‘driver coercion” is added as by the D.O.T. in its effort beyond roadside inspections and gain more FMCSA compliance from Carriers. (Read More:   DOT roadside Inspections enforcement status )

FMCSA backs drivers with coercion rule  : FleetOwner.com

Kevin Jones

A new rule to protect drivers from being compelled to violate federal safety regulations is set to publish today in the Federal Register. Known as the “driver coercion” rule, it provides FMCSA with the authority to go after not only carriers, but also shippers, receivers, and transportation intermediaries. ( read more )

FMCSA Scott Darling Says ELD Rule In Final Stages Of Approval

Leave a comment

Here’s a video on ELD’s

PHILADELPHIA. Scott Darling, acting administrator for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), said the agency’s long awaited final rule mandating electronic logging devices (ELDs) for the trucking industry should be “out in the next several months” as it is in the “final stages” of approval at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Without this ruling, online fleet management systems cannot assure fleet owners of compliant operations.  There is a thought here.

  • Why has it taken so long to bring the ruling forward?
  • Is it true that those who cannot afford to use online fleet management systems hurt the fleet industry and economy?
  • Could companies have positioned themselves, by whatever means, to receive leaked-information advantage?
  • Isn’t this creating a quantum leap in additional regulations? Who is this good for? 
  • If current regulations are exercised, wouldn’t that be enough to  ”  . . . take unsafe carriers and drivers off the road.”? 

In a speech given at the American Trucking Association’s (ATA) annual Management Conference & Exhibition (MC&E), Darling called upon the industry to help his agency weed out “unsafe” operators.

“We need to do everything we can to take unsafe carriers and drivers off the road,” he stressed. “They hurt our industry and our economy.”

via FMCSA says ELD rule is on it’s way | In final stages of approval | Regulations content from Fleet Owner.

Going Faster Than 65 mph: What’s The Difference? I’ll Get There Faster.

Leave a comment

It is safer for the truck drives at the slower speed because they have more time to react to sudden changes up ahead.

Delivery trucks are designed to perform better at 60 to 65 mph speed range.  Doing so will enhance the likelihood of fewer breakdowns because of putting less stress on the drive train. That is why they arrive new and with the maximum speed limited to 60 or 65 mph.

WHAT SYSCO IS DOING

Education of our delivery associates is another significant strategy for saving energy. We have installed technology on all our trucks that limits their speed to 60 miles per hour. Limiting speed not only reduces fuel use but also improves Delivery Associate safety. Sysco’s delivery associates are trained to drive safely and efficiently, eliminating “jack rabbit” starts and maintaining proper following distances in all driving situations. We use on-board computers to monitor and improve individual vehicle and delivery associate fuel efficiency. When manual transmissions are used, delivery associates are trained in progressive shifting techniques which ensure maximum fuel efficiency. Automatic transmissions are calibrated for maximum fuel economy and engines are set to turn off automatically when unattended.

DO THE MATH

image

Good reasons for traveling at the model speed..

  1. Fewer Accidents
  2. Less expense to run.
  3. Less stress to drive safely
  4. Better employee driver well-being

Quote Source:  Sysco Sustainability Report 2013

http://sustainability.sysco.com/operating-sustainably/moving-products/

Do I Need a USDOT Number?

Leave a comment

Do I Need a USDOT Number? – Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

What is a USDOT Number?

Companies that operate commercial vehicles transporting passengers or hauling cargo in interstate commerce must be registered with the FMCSA and must have a USDOT Number. Also, commercial intrastate hazardous materials carriers who haul quantities requiring a safety permit must register for a USDOT Number.

The USDOT Number serves as a unique identifier when collecting and monitoring a company’s safety information acquired during audits, compliance reviews, crash investigations, and inspections.

Do I Need One?

You are required to obtain a USDOT number if you have a vehicle that:

  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating, or gross vehicle weight or gross combination weight, of 4,536 kg (10,001 pounds) or more, whichever is greater; or
  • Is designed or used to transport more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation; or
  • Is designed or used to transport more than 15 passengers, including the driver, and is not used to transport passengers for compensation; or
  • Is used in transporting material found by the Secretary of Transportation to be hazardous and transported in a quantity requiring placarding.
AND is involved in Interstate commerce:

Trade, traffic, or transportation in the United States—

  • Between a place in a State and a place outside of such State (including a place outside of the United States);
  • Between two places in a State through another State or a place outside of the United States; or
  • Between two places in a State as part of trade, traffic, or transportation originating or terminating outside the State or the United States.

You are required by FMCSA to obtain USDOT Number and comply with the Federal Regulations.

It is the responsibility of motor carrier operators and drivers to know and comply with all applicable Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. Safety compliance and safe operations translate into saved lives and property.  We believe the information in this package, when effectively applied, will contribute to safer motor carrier operations and highways.

States that Require a DOT Number

Apart from federal regulations, some states require commercial motor vehicle registrants to obtain a USDOT Number. These states include:

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • Nebraska
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Updated: Thursday, May 1, 2014

var flattr_uid = ”;
var flattr_tle = ‘Do I Need a USDOT Number?’;
var flattr_dsc = ‘
Do I Need a USDOT Number? – Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

What is a USDOT Number?

Companies that operate commercial vehicles transporting passengers or hauling cargo in interstate commerce must be registered with the FMCSA and must have a USDOT Number. Also, commercial intrastate hazardous materials carriers who haul quantities requiring a safety permit must register for a USDOT Number.

The USDOT Number serves as a unique identifier when collecting and monitoring a company’s safety information acquired during audits, compliance reviews, crash investigations, and inspections.

Do I Need One?

You are required to obtain a USDOT number if you have a vehicle that:

  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating, or gross vehicle weight or gross combination weight, of 4,536 kg (10,001 pounds) or more, whichever is greater; or
  • Is designed or used to transport more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation; or
  • Is designed or used to transport more than 15 passengers, including the driver, and is not used to transport passengers for compensation; or
  • Is used in transporting material found by the Secretary of Transportation to be hazardous and transported in a quantity requiring placarding.
AND is involved in Interstate commerce:

Trade, traffic, or transportation in the United States—

  • Between a place in a State and a place outside of such State (including a place outside of the United States);
  • Between two places in a State through another State or a place outside of the United States; or
  • Between two places in a State as part of trade, traffic, or transportation originating or terminating outside the State or the United States.

You are required by FMCSA to obtain USDOT Number and comply with the Federal Regulations.

It is the responsibility of motor carrier operators and drivers to know and comply with all applicable Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. Safety compliance and safe operations translate into saved lives and property.  We believe the information in this package, when effectively applied, will contribute to safer motor carrier operations and highways.

States that Require a DOT Number

Apart from federal regulations, some states require commercial motor vehicle registrants to obtain a USDOT Number. These states include:

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • Nebraska
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Updated: Thursday, May 1, 2014

‘;
var flattr_cat = ‘text’;
var flattr_lng = ‘en_US’;
var flattr_tag = ”;
var flattr_url = ‘https://dotfleets.wordpress.com/2015/01/06/do-i-need-a-usdot-number/’;
var flattr_hide = ‘false’;

Drivers Take Note: Left Lane is for Passing: Now Florida Law

2 Comments

Hat TIp: Wesley Chapel Community.Com

I got a call from a person driving behind one of our trucks today.  They told me our driver was driving along as he pleased in the ‘passing lane’  without consideration for those who wanted to pass behind him.  He called us as a courtesy to inform that this is now against the law to simply drive to your destination in the left most lane.  He was calling from the FL Turnpike.   I searched and this is what I found . . .  the caller was correct. Drivers who stay in the passing lane too long may be trolling for a traffic ticket.  

Driving below the speed of traffic in the left hand lane of any multi-lane road in Florida is not only annoying, it is now illegal thanks to 2014 revisions to Florida’s Laws.

According to the newly revised Florida State Statute 316.081, “a driver may not continue to operate a motor vehicle in the furthermost left-hand lane if the driver knows or reasonably should know that he or she is being overtaken in that lane from the rear by a motor vehicle traveling at a higher rate of speed.”

What is the cost for such a violation?  In Pasco County it will cost violators $164 and three points on their driver license if ticketed. To be reasonable the law has two common sense exemptions where one may continue to drive in the left lane for a short period of time.

  1. You are not required to move over to be passed if you are passing someone yourself.
  2. You are not required to move over to be passed if you are about to make a left hand turn at a nearby intersection.

Short of those exemptions, it is now illegal to continually drive in the left lane when others are behind you.  If approached from behind (regardless of speed) you must move over and allow other’s to pass you.

Experts in traffic and transportation say that if followed, this law will significantly reduce road rage issues, and allow for more efficient travel for all. Public awareness is the key to success

Gaps Eat Ankles and Legs

Leave a comment

LetYummyYummyGapTruckEveryone is late and you are already late for the next thing you had to do 30 minutes ago.  You’ve backed up to the dock and danged if you have time to mess with the ramp.  So you maneuver  and have the forklift guy snatch the pallet as you’ve done a 1000 times before . . . UNTIL . . . you slip and step into the gap.  NOW YOUR ARE REALLY GOING TO BE LATE.

The fall protection standard, at 29 CFR §1926.500(b), defines a hole as “a gap or void 2 inches…or more in its least dimension, in a floor, roof, or other walking/working surface.” The standard has two requirements with respect to holes. §1926.501(b)(4)(ii) requires that employees be protected from tripping or stepping into holes by placing covers over them. This provision does not specify a minimum depth for the requirement to apply. [click here]

QUESTION

What would you do to prevent this?  Policy?  Training? Go fill out some forms?  Have a meeting?  Take care to the guy and keep the product moving, the rest will take care of itself?

Older Entries

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 867 other followers