Hours of Service Logs and 11-14 rule

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Fleet D.O.T. & Safety Compliance | Focused Information for the Property Carrying, NON-CDL  Straight Truck Carriers

In general, a CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business and is involved in interstate commerce and fits any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Crosses state boundaries
  • Your company transports out-of-state products picked up at the airport (yes, even if your trucks never leave the state.)

ELECTRONIC LOGGING DEVICE RULE EXEMPTION

Most drivers must follow these new  HOS Regulations, if they drive a commercial motor vehicle, or CMV.  However, Aug. 31st, 2016 FMSA made an exemption  for their Electronic Logging Device (ELD) ruling for a carrier whose drivers only need to complete 8 log sheets or less / month.

11-Hour Driving Limit

May drive a maximum of 11 hours after 10 consecutive hours off duty.

14-Hour Limit

May not drive beyond the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty, following 10 consecutive hours off duty. Off-duty time does not extend the 14-hour period.

Rest Breaks

Does not apply to drivers using either of the short-haul exceptions in 395.1(e). [49 CFR 397.5 mandatory “in attendance” time may be included in break if no other duties performed]

DotFleets Note:

To insure drivers will take preventive action when they find they cannot contine driving in a alert because of fatigue, always encourage your drivers to call their supervisor and work out a solution.  An extra night on the road is better than an accident on the road.

Later you can investigate reasons for your driver’s fatigue, even if the driver is within the 11-14 rule.

  • Physical exhaustion: driver misused their off-time before delivery day
  • Physical impairment: driver is stuggling with diabetes and more prone to exhaustion and difficulty maintaining their attention as a consequence.
  • Physical impairments and mental acuity problems because the driver is
  • Physical impairments because the driver has diabetes or is taking medications for some ailment which affects their ability to stay alert and they are failing to comply with the medication advisements, medication schedule.
  • Failure to following diet restrictions.
  • others reasons you might know of, please put in the comments. Thanks

Work with your team.  Make effort with your time to discover the cause(s).  Work through your management team to design a corrective action for the benefit of the company mission and those who keeping it alive and on course.

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Who Is Exempt From FMCSA ELD Rule

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For many of the carriers I know, you will be exempt from the ELD ruling if your Drivers use paper DOT RODS for not more that 8 days during each 30 day period.  This exemption was made clear on August 31st 2016.

FMCSA ELD Compliance Timeline

FMCSA ELD Compliance Timeline

Here’s a video on the goals of ELD’s

 

 

VOCABULARY: More

Trianing – HOS – Two Day Trips – 10 Consecutive Hours Off-Duty

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Make sure your drivers are trained to keep their Hours of Service logs up to-date and understand how to stay in compliance with 10 off duty – not more than 11 hrs driving – not more than 14 hrs on duty..

If the HOS Log is being kept up to-date, the driver will recognize the 10 consecutive hour off-duty problem ahead of time and contact the company for alternate plans to stay in compliance and an alert, safe driver.

Remember: Fatigue is the killer, not the the HOS regulations.

Don’t let this happen to you.10hoursexampleoffduty-thumb.jpg

Carrier Monitoring DOT Safety Measurements

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English: Antique New Hampshire speed limit sig...

English: Antique New Hampshire speed limit sign. On display at Clark’s Trading Post, Lincoln New Hampshire. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

First:  Carriers need to set the standard and manage safety habits of ‘their drivers and the trucks they drive.  In an ideal world, the concern for others well-being can  inspire companies to create a safety culture for the drivers and their habits.

Note Well:   If your company is distracted from acting on your commitment to  public and employee safety, the DOT is determined to help remind you.  If you are really sloppy about your road safety, you could be looking for a new line of work.

Carrier management would be wise to go to http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/ and enter their DOT# .

DOT Safety Measurement Site

Once your enter your DOT# you will see how the Department of Transportation sees you, the Carrier.   and you will understand how much of a regulatory burden may be on your horizon or patting on the back . . . is due.

You will also be able to see the kind of citations your company has received, whether or not your drivers have turned in citations received during road inspections.

If you DOT# has passed the 65th percentile, your company is subject to the possibility of a field audit at any time from the DOT.  The carrier below has passed the 65% percentile because of three (3 ) citations.

Interpreting DOT Safety Measurement Emphesis Hand Held

Two (2) citations:  Driver was caught using a hand-held cellular phone while driving.

One (1) citation:  Driver was speeding 11-14 miles over the posted speed limit.

Both are heavily weighted.

Your take-away for making it this far:

Monitoring your DOT# Safety Measurement at http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/    you can take corrective action, even if the citation ( s ) were not reported by your drivers.

Recommendation:  By monitor your DOT# at    http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/  quarterly or more frequently you company’s health is more assured.

Driver Safety Hotline – Dealing with Reports

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This is no easy task, especially when your are focused on the win-win. This is useful for any fleet safety manager.

Safety Is My Goal's Blog

cropped-decal-ate-truck.jpgOne of the most often asked questions from safety managers is “what am I supposed to do with a driver who has received a Motorist Observation Report?”

Blended Risk ScoreFor many, the assumption is that a report = disciplinary action, blame setting, arguments and confrontations that lead to sulky drivers and higher turnover.

However, that’s never what we had in mind (despite our competitors ingraining that ‘mentality’ into their fleet customers over the past three decades)….

The goal of a safety hotline is to increase safety results, not punish drivers.  

Unfortunately, many supervisors have never had training or education on “how to coach/counsel” for improved habits and to motivate drivers to seek a better level of safety awareness.  The other issue is often a lack of tools in the tool kit to help drivers.

Another traffic picFor example, when we send a report we not only provide as much detail as possible (taking…

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Six Strategies for Stronger Safety Culture

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Always good to evaluate our approach and effectiveness. This is a useful for any safety professional.

Safety Is My Goal's Blog

EHS Today recently blogged about “Six Strategies for Stronger Safety Culture” (click HERE to see original article)

Their points provided good advice for any sort of safety culture:

1. Accountability

Setting goals and making them visible shows confidence on the part of management. Most importantly, it shows confidence that their employees will take safety seriously enough that they have minimal injuries. Everyone has something at stake when goals are set and managed. If the goals are a management priority, management must find ways to convey that to the people that work for them.

2. Engagement

CoachingWhen you look at companies with low X-mods and a consistent record of minimal injuries, the one trait that seems common to all of them is that the workforce is engaged in the company’s safety program. Employees are involved and participate. They feel like safety is a big part of the job, and there’s no…

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Traffic Fatalities Increased In 2012

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Safety is improving, keep it up.

Safety Is My Goal's Blog

NHTSA 2012 OverviewWhile it’s tragic that deaths increased in 2012, we are glad that highway deaths over the past five years are at historic lows.  What’s strange was the sudden and unexpected rise in crash activity during the first two quarters of 2012 (the first quarter jump in activity was the largest spike in recorded NHTSA history.)

So here’s the latest from NHTSA:

  • …highway deaths increased to 33,561 in 2012, which is 1,082 more fatalities than in 2011. The majority of the increase in deaths, 72 percent, occurred in the first quarter of the year.
  • While Americans drove approximately the same amount of miles in 2012 as in the previous year, the new FARS data released today showed a 3.3 percent increase in fatalities from the previous year.
  • Fatalities in 2011 were at the lowest level since 1949 and even with this slight increase in 2012, we are still at the same…

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