Who Is Exempt From FMCSA ELD Rule

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For many of the carriers I know, you will be exempt from the ELD ruling if your Drivers use paper DOT RODS for not more that 8 days during each 30 day period.  This exemption was made clear on August 31st 2016.

FMCSA ELD Compliance Timeline

FMCSA ELD Compliance Timeline

Here’s a video on the goals of ELD’s

 

 

VOCABULARY: More

Going Faster Than 65 mph: What’s The Difference? I’ll Get There Faster.

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It is safer for the truck drives at the slower speed because they have more time to react to sudden changes up ahead. Yes? Not sure?  Try the calculator below.

Delivery trucks are designed to perform better at 60 to 65 mph speed range. Manufacturers set their controls to limit speed to 65 mph.  Doing so will enhance the likelihood of fewer breakdowns because of putting less stress on the drive train and fewer accidents becuse of the shorter stopping distance. This is a good example I found from the UK.

stoppingdistance

WHAT SYSCO IS DOING

Education of our delivery associates is another significant strategy for saving energy. We have installed technology on all our trucks that limits their speed to 65 miles per hour. Limiting speed not only reduces fuel use but also improves Delivery Associate safety. Sysco’s delivery associates are trained to drive safely and efficiently, eliminating “jack rabbit” starts and maintaining proper following distances in all driving situations. We use on-board computers to monitor and improve individual vehicle and delivery associate fuel efficiency. When manual transmissions are used, delivery associates are trained in progressive shifting techniques which ensure maximum fuel efficiency. Automatic transmissions are calibrated for maximum fuel economy and engines are set to turn off automatically when unattended.

DO THE MATH

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Good reasons for traveling at the model speed..

  1. Shorter stopping distance
  2. Less distance traveled during reaction time
  3. Fewer Accidents
  4. Equipment ware and tare more tolerable
  5. Less stress to drive safely
  6. Better employee and fellow road traveler well-being

Quote Source:  Sysco Sustainability Report 2013

http://sustainability.sysco.com/operating-sustainably/moving-products/

Trianing – HOS – Two Day Trips – 10 Consecutive Hours Off-Duty

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Make sure your drivers are trained to keep their Hours of Service logs up to-date and understand how to stay in compliance with 10 off duty – not more than 11 hrs driving – not more than 14 hrs on duty..

If the HOS Log is being kept up to-date, the driver will recognize the 10 consecutive hour off-duty problem ahead of time and contact the company for alternate plans to stay in compliance and an alert, safe driver.

Remember: Fatigue is the killer, not the the HOS regulations.

Don’t let this happen to you.10hoursexampleoffduty-thumb.jpg

Accident Scene : Driver 5 Commandments

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St. Patrick's Day Collision  1 of 4

St. Patrick’s Day Collision 1 of 4 (Photo credit: 7mary3)

The time to plan how you’re going to respond at the scene of an accident is before you are involved in an accident. How a truck driver responds on the scene has a major impact on the outcome of any claims that may follow.

Here’s a list of five things drivers should never, ever do at the scene of an accident:

1. Do not leave the scene.

Drivers should stay on the scene of an accident until police and emergency responders arrive and tell them they can leave. Sounds like common sense, but it happens.

2. Do not get argumentative or physical.

Picking a fight — verbal or physical — is a surefire way to make a bad situation worse. How the driver conducts himself on the scene can have a major impact on whether the bystanders become a witness for or against a motor carrier. The emotional response of those involved in the situation will have an impact on how they remember the “facts” — it’s just human nature.

3. Do not discuss facts regarding the accident with anyone other than your company and the police.

There will be people who show up on the scene and start asking questions.Some may be innocent bystanders, some may be ambulance chasers sniffing for a big dollar verdict. We’ve run into situations where people working for attorneys have approached a driver saying “I’m from your insurance company, can you explain what happened?” The only people a driver should discuss the situation with is his or her own company and the police.

4. Do not admit to liability at the scene or volunteer to make payments — allow your company to make that decision after full investigation.

It’s human nature to want to say “sorry” when something goes awry — but even saying “I’m sorry this happened” can be twisted by a prosecutor into an admission of guilt. While your driver will certainly feel bad, reinforce that who’s at fault and who has liability will be determined following a full investigation.

5. Do not delay reporting an accident, no matter how minor it may seem.

The quicker a driver reports an accident, the quicker you can be prepared to respond. Days, hours, and minutes matter when it comes to collecting evidence and gathering witness testimony. Even a fender bender that seems minor needs to be reported right away — we have seen several accidents that seemed small blow up when the motorist has time to stew over it.

In some cases, drug testing may be required following an accident, either by the DOT or your insurance company. Controlled Substance Tests must be conducted within 32 hours and alcohol tests must be conducted within two hours. If the test is not performed within these time frames, you must provide documents stating the reason.

Ensuring that your drivers are well trained on how to respond at the scene of an accident is vitally important — but we’ve found that most companies offer little to no training on this. Training typically focuses on preventing accidents (which is clearly important), but stopping there leaves out a critical component.

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DOT– Cell Use and the Delivery Driver Q & A

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If you pick up product which originates from other states, then you are an interstate carrier and are required to apply for and use DOT identifications on all of your delivery vehicles.  As of  Jan. 3rd, 2012

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Q: Are wired or wireless earpieces allowed?

 

A: Yes. Hands-free use of a mobile telephone is allowed using either a wired or wireless earpiece, or the speakerphone function of the mobile telephone. Wireless connection of the mobile telephone to the vehicle for hands-free operation of the telephone, which would allow the use of single-button controls on the steering wheel or dashboard, would also be allowed.

   

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Q: Are commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers allowed to use push-to-talk mobile communications equipment while driving?

 

A: Yes, provided the driver does not reach for, dial, or hold the actual mobile telephone in his/her hand while driving and the driver is able to touch the button needed to operate the push-to-talk feature from the normal seated position with the safety belt fastened. Generally, the use of this type of communications equipment does not require drivers to take their eyes off of the forward roadway because the button used to enable the driver to communicate can be operated from the normal seated position with the safety belt fastened. For example, if the mobile phone is mounted in a cradle or similar device near the driver, or there is a remote push-to-talk button near the vehicle controls to allow the driver to communicate without reaching for, dialing, or holding the actual mobile telephone in his/her hands while driving, the equipment may be used.

   
   

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Q: What is required of the employer in terms of company policy or training?

 

A: The rule does not require motor carriers to establish written policies in terms of company policy or training programs for their drivers. However, employers are prohibited from allowing or requiring their drivers to use hand-held mobile phones. A motor carrier may establish policies or practices that make it clear that the employer does not require or allow hand-held mobile telephone use while driving a CMV in interstate commerce. The carrier is responsible for its drivers’ conduct.

   

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Q: Is dialing a phone number allowed under this rule?

 

A: No. Dialing a mobile telephone while operating a CMV in interstate commerce is prohibited by the rule. A driver can initiate, answer, or terminate a call by touching a single button on a mobile telephone, earpiece, steering wheel, or instrument panel – comparable to using vehicle controls or instrument panel functions, such as the radio or climate control system.

   

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Q: Can a driver reach for a mobile telephone even if he/she intends to use the hands-free function?

 

A: No. In order to comply with this rule, a driver must have his or her mobile telephone located where the driver is able to initiate, answer, or terminate a call by touching a single button while the driver is in the seated driving position and properly restrained by a seat belt. If the mobile telephone is not close to the driver and operable while the driver is restrained by properly installed and adjusted seat belts, then the driver is considered to be reaching for the mobile phone, which is prohibited by the rule.

 

http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/about/other/faq/cellphone-ban-faqs.aspx

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