Going Faster Than 65 mph: What’s The Difference? I’ll Get There Faster.

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It is safer for the truck drives at the slower speed because they have more time to react to sudden changes up ahead. Yes? Not sure?  Try the calculator below.

Delivery trucks are designed to perform better at 60 to 65 mph speed range. Manufacturers set their controls to limit speed to 65 mph.  Doing so will enhance the likelihood of fewer breakdowns because of putting less stress on the drive train and fewer accidents becuse of the shorter stopping distance. This is a good example I found from the UK.

stoppingdistance

WHAT SYSCO IS DOING

Education of our delivery associates is another significant strategy for saving energy. We have installed technology on all our trucks that limits their speed to 65 miles per hour. Limiting speed not only reduces fuel use but also improves Delivery Associate safety. Sysco’s delivery associates are trained to drive safely and efficiently, eliminating “jack rabbit” starts and maintaining proper following distances in all driving situations. We use on-board computers to monitor and improve individual vehicle and delivery associate fuel efficiency. When manual transmissions are used, delivery associates are trained in progressive shifting techniques which ensure maximum fuel efficiency. Automatic transmissions are calibrated for maximum fuel economy and engines are set to turn off automatically when unattended.

DO THE MATH

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Good reasons for traveling at the model speed..

  1. Shorter stopping distance
  2. Less distance traveled during reaction time
  3. Fewer Accidents
  4. Equipment ware and tare more tolerable
  5. Less stress to drive safely
  6. Better employee and fellow road traveler well-being

Quote Source:  Sysco Sustainability Report 2013

http://sustainability.sysco.com/operating-sustainably/moving-products/

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Drivers Take Note: Left Lane is for Passing: Now Florida Law

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Hat TIp: Wesley Chapel Community.Com

I got a call from a person driving behind one of our trucks today.  They told me our driver was driving along as he pleased in the ‘passing lane’  without consideration for those who wanted to pass behind him.  He called us as a courtesy to inform that this is now against the law to simply drive to your destination in the left most lane.  He was calling from the FL Turnpike.   I searched and this is what I found . . .  the caller was correct. Drivers who stay in the passing lane too long may be trolling for a traffic ticket.  

Driving below the speed of traffic in the left hand lane of any multi-lane road in Florida is not only annoying, it is now illegal thanks to 2014 revisions to Florida’s Laws.

According to the newly revised Florida State Statute 316.081, “a driver may not continue to operate a motor vehicle in the furthermost left-hand lane if the driver knows or reasonably should know that he or she is being overtaken in that lane from the rear by a motor vehicle traveling at a higher rate of speed.”

What is the cost for such a violation?  In Pasco County it will cost violators $164 and three points on their driver license if ticketed. To be reasonable the law has two common sense exemptions where one may continue to drive in the left lane for a short period of time.

  1. You are not required to move over to be passed if you are passing someone yourself.
  2. You are not required to move over to be passed if you are about to make a left hand turn at a nearby intersection.

Short of those exemptions, it is now illegal to continually drive in the left lane when others are behind you.  If approached from behind (regardless of speed) you must move over and allow other’s to pass you.

Experts in traffic and transportation say that if followed, this law will significantly reduce road rage issues, and allow for more efficient travel for all. Public awareness is the key to success

Gaps Eat Ankles and Legs

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LetYummyYummyGapTruckEveryone is late and you are already late for the next thing you had to do 30 minutes ago.  You’ve backed up to the dock and danged if you have time to mess with the ramp.  So you maneuver  and have the forklift guy snatch the pallet as you’ve done a 1000 times before . . . UNTIL . . . you slip and step into the gap.  NOW YOUR ARE REALLY GOING TO BE LATE.

The fall protection standard, at 29 CFR §1926.500(b), defines a hole as “a gap or void 2 inches…or more in its least dimension, in a floor, roof, or other walking/working surface.” The standard has two requirements with respect to holes. §1926.501(b)(4)(ii) requires that employees be protected from tripping or stepping into holes by placing covers over them. This provision does not specify a minimum depth for the requirement to apply. [click here]

QUESTION

What would you do to prevent this?  Policy?  Training? Go fill out some forms?  Have a meeting?  Take care to the guy and keep the product moving, the rest will take care of itself?

Carrier Monitoring DOT Safety Measurements

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English: Antique New Hampshire speed limit sig...

English: Antique New Hampshire speed limit sign. On display at Clark’s Trading Post, Lincoln New Hampshire. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

First:  Carriers need to set the standard and manage safety habits of ‘their drivers and the trucks they drive.  In an ideal world, the concern for others well-being can  inspire companies to create a safety culture for the drivers and their habits.

Note Well:   If your company is distracted from acting on your commitment to  public and employee safety, the DOT is determined to help remind you.  If you are really sloppy about your road safety, you could be looking for a new line of work.

Carrier management would be wise to go to http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/ and enter their DOT# .

DOT Safety Measurement Site

Once your enter your DOT# you will see how the Department of Transportation sees you, the Carrier.   and you will understand how much of a regulatory burden may be on your horizon or patting on the back . . . is due.

You will also be able to see the kind of citations your company has received, whether or not your drivers have turned in citations received during road inspections.

If you DOT# has passed the 65th percentile, your company is subject to the possibility of a field audit at any time from the DOT.  The carrier below has passed the 65% percentile because of three (3 ) citations.

Interpreting DOT Safety Measurement Emphesis Hand Held

Two (2) citations:  Driver was caught using a hand-held cellular phone while driving.

One (1) citation:  Driver was speeding 11-14 miles over the posted speed limit.

Both are heavily weighted.

Your take-away for making it this far:

Monitoring your DOT# Safety Measurement at http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/    you can take corrective action, even if the citation ( s ) were not reported by your drivers.

Recommendation:  By monitor your DOT# at    http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/  quarterly or more frequently you company’s health is more assured.

Truck Battery Dead Drill Down

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Battery goes dead.

Repair discovers the box light was on.

Four (4) possible scenarios.

  1. The battery is expired, exhausted and needs to be replaced anyway.
  2. The alternator is not functioning
  3. The box light mechanism is not functioning properly, causing the lights to continue burning 1.
  4. The driver left the box light on, or the door to the box which activates turn off of the light was left open or ajar causing the light to be left on 2.
  • In the case of this battery dead event , we discovered the sensors controlling the on-off condition were malfunctioning  and therefore #3  3.   For an immediate fix, we removed the light bulbs to continue delivering with the truck until  it can be repaired 4.

If it were #4 the fleet administrator would need to identify the driver.  Here is how we used Fleetmatics/Reveal to identify the last driver before battery failure :

1. Going to the main page and clicking on the Admin from the user pull-down menu

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2. Pick the Vehicle List

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3. Choosing your Truck for the drill down and clicking on the edit icon

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4. In the [Edit Vehicle] click on the [Assignment History] tab

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5. On the Vehicle’s Assignment History page look on the bottom for driver’s assignments

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More Simply:

Admin-> Vehicle List -> on right side of list click on clip_image012 for desired vehicle -> Click on /Assignment History\ tab. . . .

Footnotes:

1 Assumes hands-on knowledge of the delivery vehicle specs

2 Assumes communication with drivers while loading truck notice the lights are not functioning properly and report to the administrator/supervisor

3 Assumes the administrator has gone to the truck to evaluate

4 Assumes company management/ fleet manager has ordered the driver fob option with Fleetmatics, distributed them to the drivers and programmed driver ID with the unique fobs

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Accident Scene : Driver 5 Commandments

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St. Patrick's Day Collision  1 of 4

St. Patrick’s Day Collision 1 of 4 (Photo credit: 7mary3)

The time to plan how you’re going to respond at the scene of an accident is before you are involved in an accident. How a truck driver responds on the scene has a major impact on the outcome of any claims that may follow.

Here’s a list of five things drivers should never, ever do at the scene of an accident:

1. Do not leave the scene.

Drivers should stay on the scene of an accident until police and emergency responders arrive and tell them they can leave. Sounds like common sense, but it happens.

2. Do not get argumentative or physical.

Picking a fight — verbal or physical — is a surefire way to make a bad situation worse. How the driver conducts himself on the scene can have a major impact on whether the bystanders become a witness for or against a motor carrier. The emotional response of those involved in the situation will have an impact on how they remember the “facts” — it’s just human nature.

3. Do not discuss facts regarding the accident with anyone other than your company and the police.

There will be people who show up on the scene and start asking questions.Some may be innocent bystanders, some may be ambulance chasers sniffing for a big dollar verdict. We’ve run into situations where people working for attorneys have approached a driver saying “I’m from your insurance company, can you explain what happened?” The only people a driver should discuss the situation with is his or her own company and the police.

4. Do not admit to liability at the scene or volunteer to make payments — allow your company to make that decision after full investigation.

It’s human nature to want to say “sorry” when something goes awry — but even saying “I’m sorry this happened” can be twisted by a prosecutor into an admission of guilt. While your driver will certainly feel bad, reinforce that who’s at fault and who has liability will be determined following a full investigation.

5. Do not delay reporting an accident, no matter how minor it may seem.

The quicker a driver reports an accident, the quicker you can be prepared to respond. Days, hours, and minutes matter when it comes to collecting evidence and gathering witness testimony. Even a fender bender that seems minor needs to be reported right away — we have seen several accidents that seemed small blow up when the motorist has time to stew over it.

In some cases, drug testing may be required following an accident, either by the DOT or your insurance company. Controlled Substance Tests must be conducted within 32 hours and alcohol tests must be conducted within two hours. If the test is not performed within these time frames, you must provide documents stating the reason.

Ensuring that your drivers are well trained on how to respond at the scene of an accident is vitally important — but we’ve found that most companies offer little to no training on this. Training typically focuses on preventing accidents (which is clearly important), but stopping there leaves out a critical component.

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How Do I Know If I Am An Interstate Carrier?

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Map of Florida highlighting Nassau County

Map of Florida highlighting Nassau County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

YOU ARE INTERSTATE:

I f you are a transporter (Motor Carrier) of product, which was manifested outside of the state, and your are shipping straight-through from Airport or Depot you are an interstate carrier and are required to comply with DOT Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR) . 

Therefore, you are advised to apply for Your DOT Motor Identification Number (MCS-150) and comply with  DOT  Interstate Hours On-Duty and Off-Duty and Maximum Hours Driving [click here](a downloadable pdf sheet)  apply to  any transporter of product that came from out of their state. 

 

YOU ARE INTRASTATE:

If your operation is solely within the State of Florida, and the commerce you engage in is solely within the State of Florida, e.g. no straight-through shipments, you are an intrastate carrier

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