Hours of Service Logs and 11-14 rule

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Fleet D.O.T. & Safety Compliance | Focused Information for the Property Carrying, NON-CDL  Straight Truck Carriers

In general, a CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business and is involved in interstate commerce and fits any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Crosses state boundaries
  • Your company transports out-of-state products picked up at the airport (yes, even if your trucks never leave the state.)

ELECTRONIC LOGGING DEVICE RULE EXEMPTION

Most drivers must follow these new  HOS Regulations, if they drive a commercial motor vehicle, or CMV.  However, Aug. 31st, 2016 FMSA made an exemption  for their Electronic Logging Device (ELD) ruling for a carrier whose drivers only need to complete 8 log sheets or less / month.

11-Hour Driving Limit

May drive a maximum of 11 hours after 10 consecutive hours off duty.

14-Hour Limit

May not drive beyond the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty, following 10 consecutive hours off duty. Off-duty time does not extend the 14-hour period.

Rest Breaks

Does not apply to drivers using either of the short-haul exceptions in 395.1(e). [49 CFR 397.5 mandatory “in attendance” time may be included in break if no other duties performed]

DotFleets Note:

To insure drivers will take preventive action when they find they cannot contine driving in a alert because of fatigue, always encourage your drivers to call their supervisor and work out a solution.  An extra night on the road is better than an accident on the road.

Later you can investigate reasons for your driver’s fatigue, even if the driver is within the 11-14 rule.

  • Physical exhaustion: driver misused their off-time before delivery day
  • Physical impairment: driver is stuggling with diabetes and more prone to exhaustion and difficulty maintaining their attention as a consequence.
  • Physical impairments and mental acuity problems because the driver is
  • Physical impairments because the driver has diabetes or is taking medications for some ailment which affects their ability to stay alert and they are failing to comply with the medication advisements, medication schedule.
  • Failure to following diet restrictions.
  • others reasons you might know of, please put in the comments. Thanks

Work with your team.  Make effort with your time to discover the cause(s).  Work through your management team to design a corrective action for the benefit of the company mission and those who keeping it alive and on course.

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Carrier Monitoring DOT Safety Measurements

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English: Antique New Hampshire speed limit sig...

English: Antique New Hampshire speed limit sign. On display at Clark’s Trading Post, Lincoln New Hampshire. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

First:  Carriers need to set the standard and manage safety habits of ‘their drivers and the trucks they drive.  In an ideal world, the concern for others well-being can  inspire companies to create a safety culture for the drivers and their habits.

Note Well:   If your company is distracted from acting on your commitment to  public and employee safety, the DOT is determined to help remind you.  If you are really sloppy about your road safety, you could be looking for a new line of work.

Carrier management would be wise to go to http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/ and enter their DOT# .

DOT Safety Measurement Site

Once your enter your DOT# you will see how the Department of Transportation sees you, the Carrier.   and you will understand how much of a regulatory burden may be on your horizon or patting on the back . . . is due.

You will also be able to see the kind of citations your company has received, whether or not your drivers have turned in citations received during road inspections.

If you DOT# has passed the 65th percentile, your company is subject to the possibility of a field audit at any time from the DOT.  The carrier below has passed the 65% percentile because of three (3 ) citations.

Interpreting DOT Safety Measurement Emphesis Hand Held

Two (2) citations:  Driver was caught using a hand-held cellular phone while driving.

One (1) citation:  Driver was speeding 11-14 miles over the posted speed limit.

Both are heavily weighted.

Your take-away for making it this far:

Monitoring your DOT# Safety Measurement at http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/    you can take corrective action, even if the citation ( s ) were not reported by your drivers.

Recommendation:  By monitor your DOT# at    http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/  quarterly or more frequently you company’s health is more assured.

DOT– Cell Use and the Delivery Driver Q & A

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If you pick up product which originates from other states, then you are an interstate carrier and are required to apply for and use DOT identifications on all of your delivery vehicles.  As of  Jan. 3rd, 2012

1

Q: Are wired or wireless earpieces allowed?

 

A: Yes. Hands-free use of a mobile telephone is allowed using either a wired or wireless earpiece, or the speakerphone function of the mobile telephone. Wireless connection of the mobile telephone to the vehicle for hands-free operation of the telephone, which would allow the use of single-button controls on the steering wheel or dashboard, would also be allowed.

   

2

Q: Are commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers allowed to use push-to-talk mobile communications equipment while driving?

 

A: Yes, provided the driver does not reach for, dial, or hold the actual mobile telephone in his/her hand while driving and the driver is able to touch the button needed to operate the push-to-talk feature from the normal seated position with the safety belt fastened. Generally, the use of this type of communications equipment does not require drivers to take their eyes off of the forward roadway because the button used to enable the driver to communicate can be operated from the normal seated position with the safety belt fastened. For example, if the mobile phone is mounted in a cradle or similar device near the driver, or there is a remote push-to-talk button near the vehicle controls to allow the driver to communicate without reaching for, dialing, or holding the actual mobile telephone in his/her hands while driving, the equipment may be used.

   
   

3

Q: What is required of the employer in terms of company policy or training?

 

A: The rule does not require motor carriers to establish written policies in terms of company policy or training programs for their drivers. However, employers are prohibited from allowing or requiring their drivers to use hand-held mobile phones. A motor carrier may establish policies or practices that make it clear that the employer does not require or allow hand-held mobile telephone use while driving a CMV in interstate commerce. The carrier is responsible for its drivers’ conduct.

   

4

Q: Is dialing a phone number allowed under this rule?

 

A: No. Dialing a mobile telephone while operating a CMV in interstate commerce is prohibited by the rule. A driver can initiate, answer, or terminate a call by touching a single button on a mobile telephone, earpiece, steering wheel, or instrument panel – comparable to using vehicle controls or instrument panel functions, such as the radio or climate control system.

   

5

Q: Can a driver reach for a mobile telephone even if he/she intends to use the hands-free function?

 

A: No. In order to comply with this rule, a driver must have his or her mobile telephone located where the driver is able to initiate, answer, or terminate a call by touching a single button while the driver is in the seated driving position and properly restrained by a seat belt. If the mobile telephone is not close to the driver and operable while the driver is restrained by properly installed and adjusted seat belts, then the driver is considered to be reaching for the mobile phone, which is prohibited by the rule.

 

http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/about/other/faq/cellphone-ban-faqs.aspx

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