Hours of Service Logs and 11-14 rule

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Fleet D.O.T. & Safety Compliance | Focused Information for the Property Carrying, NON-CDL  Straight Truck Carriers

In general, a CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business and is involved in interstate commerce and fits any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Crosses state boundaries
  • Your company transports out-of-state products picked up at the airport (yes, even if your trucks never leave the state.)

ELECTRONIC LOGGING DEVICE RULE EXEMPTION

Most drivers must follow these new  HOS Regulations, if they drive a commercial motor vehicle, or CMV.  However, Aug. 31st, 2016 FMSA made an exemption  for their Electronic Logging Device (ELD) ruling for a carrier whose drivers only need to complete 8 log sheets or less / month.

11-Hour Driving Limit

May drive a maximum of 11 hours after 10 consecutive hours off duty.

14-Hour Limit

May not drive beyond the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty, following 10 consecutive hours off duty. Off-duty time does not extend the 14-hour period.

Rest Breaks

Does not apply to drivers using either of the short-haul exceptions in 395.1(e). [49 CFR 397.5 mandatory “in attendance” time may be included in break if no other duties performed]

DotFleets Note:

To insure drivers will take preventive action when they find they cannot contine driving in a alert because of fatigue, always encourage your drivers to call their supervisor and work out a solution.  An extra night on the road is better than an accident on the road.

Later you can investigate reasons for your driver’s fatigue, even if the driver is within the 11-14 rule.

  • Physical exhaustion: driver misused their off-time before delivery day
  • Physical impairment: driver is stuggling with diabetes and more prone to exhaustion and difficulty maintaining their attention as a consequence.
  • Physical impairments and mental acuity problems because the driver is
  • Physical impairments because the driver has diabetes or is taking medications for some ailment which affects their ability to stay alert and they are failing to comply with the medication advisements, medication schedule.
  • Failure to following diet restrictions.
  • others reasons you might know of, please put in the comments. Thanks

Work with your team.  Make effort with your time to discover the cause(s).  Work through your management team to design a corrective action for the benefit of the company mission and those who keeping it alive and on course.

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Who Is Exempt From FMCSA ELD Rule

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For many of the carriers I know, you will be exempt from the ELD ruling if your Drivers use paper DOT RODS for not more that 8 days during each 30 day period.  This exemption was made clear on August 31st 2016.

FMCSA ELD Compliance Timeline

FMCSA ELD Compliance Timeline

Here’s a video on the goals of ELD’s

 

 

VOCABULARY: More

Trianing – HOS – Two Day Trips – 10 Consecutive Hours Off-Duty

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Make sure your drivers are trained to keep their Hours of Service logs up to-date and understand how to stay in compliance with 10 off duty – not more than 11 hrs driving – not more than 14 hrs on duty..

If the HOS Log is being kept up to-date, the driver will recognize the 10 consecutive hour off-duty problem ahead of time and contact the company for alternate plans to stay in compliance and an alert, safe driver.

Remember: Fatigue is the killer, not the the HOS regulations.

Don’t let this happen to you.10hoursexampleoffduty-thumb.jpg

DOT – CSA 2010 Compliance

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If you are NON-COMPLIANT WITH DOT REGULATIONS,  having accidents and lawsuits already . . . it is a matter of time for DOT to audit and perhaps fine you into recognition of the value of DOT – CSA 2010 COMPLIANCE

Drivers are required to fill out records of duty status (logs); the motor carrier is required to keep them plus supporting documentation for six months.

These tires are out of compliance with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations because they have less than the required amount of tread; the truck should not be driven until maintenance has been performed.

Compliance

The commercial motor vehicle industry is highly regulated; many of the regulations are quite specific and they are frequently updated.

Services · Ruhl Forensic

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FMCSR : To Mandate EOBR or not to Mandate EOBR

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There is no doubt that fatique is a killer.  There may be a mandate coming for On-board recorders (EOBR’s) to monitor driver HOS (hours of service compliance).  There are many efforts taking place these days compelling citizens to do this and that, I hope I don’t have to name them.  Do you think this trend of Government mandated purchases

Graph outlining the relationship between numbe...

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for our own good is a good trend?  You should also let your congressman know how you see things. Click Here. 

On to the article . . .  “This proposed rule also continues the Department’s partnership with Cornell on the e-Rulemaking Initiative, an important step toward keeping President Obama’s promise of opening government to more effective citizen participation. The Cornell e-Rulemaking Initiative (CeRI) makes the federal regulatory process more accessible to the public through Regulation Room, an online public participation environment where people can learn about and discuss proposed federal regulations and provide effective feedback to the Department.

Citizens can find more information on the Cornell online effort and provide comments on the proposed rule at regulationroom.org over the next 60 days. The Department of Transportation encourages participation in this rulemaking through Regulation Room, but the public may also submit comments to the DOT docket at regulations.gov.

3373334458_808c6d0da2_s[1]The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) today issued a regulatory proposal that would require interstate commercial truck and bus companies to install electronic on-board recorders (EOBRs) to monitor their drivers’ hours-of-service (HOS) compliance.

The proposed rule would also relieve interstate motor carriers from retaining certain HOS supporting documents, such as delivery and toll receipts, which are currently used to verify the total number of hours drivers spend operating the vehicle. This part of the proposal fulfills an order of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia requiring FMCSA to publish a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding supporting documents by January 31, 2011.

“We cannot protect our roadways when commercial truck and bus companies exceed hours-of-service rules,” said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “This proposal would make our roads safer by ensuring that carriers traveling across state lines are using EOBRs to track the hours their drivers spend behind the wheel.”

EOBRs are devices attached to commercial vehicles that automatically record the number of hours drivers spend operating the vehicle. Several carriers, including Schneider National, Maverick USA, J.B. Hunt, Knight Transportation and U.S. Express Enterprise, have already installed EOBR technology on their fleets. Approximately 500,000 carriers would be affected by the proposed rule.

Under the proposal, interstate carriers that currently use Records of Duty (RODS) logbooks to document drivers’ HOS would be required to use EOBRs. Short-haul interstate carriers that use timecards to document HOS would not be required to use EOBRs.

Carriers that violate this EOBR requirement would face civil penalties of up to $11,000 for each offense. Noncompliance would also negatively impact a carrier’s safety fitness rating and DOT operating authority. In April 2010, FMCSA issued a final rule that mandates EOBRs for interstate carriers with serious patterns of HOS violations.

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