Going Faster Than 65 mph: What’s The Difference? I’ll Get There Faster.

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It is safer for the truck drives at the slower speed because they have more time to react to sudden changes up ahead. Yes? Not sure?  Try the calculator below.

Delivery trucks are designed to perform better at 60 to 65 mph speed range. Manufacturers set their controls to limit speed to 65 mph.  Doing so will enhance the likelihood of fewer breakdowns because of putting less stress on the drive train and fewer accidents becuse of the shorter stopping distance. This is a good example I found from the UK.

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WHAT SYSCO IS DOING

Education of our delivery associates is another significant strategy for saving energy. We have installed technology on all our trucks that limits their speed to 65 miles per hour. Limiting speed not only reduces fuel use but also improves Delivery Associate safety. Sysco’s delivery associates are trained to drive safely and efficiently, eliminating “jack rabbit” starts and maintaining proper following distances in all driving situations. We use on-board computers to monitor and improve individual vehicle and delivery associate fuel efficiency. When manual transmissions are used, delivery associates are trained in progressive shifting techniques which ensure maximum fuel efficiency. Automatic transmissions are calibrated for maximum fuel economy and engines are set to turn off automatically when unattended.

DO THE MATH

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Good reasons for traveling at the model speed..

  1. Shorter stopping distance
  2. Less distance traveled during reaction time
  3. Fewer Accidents
  4. Equipment ware and tare more tolerable
  5. Less stress to drive safely
  6. Better employee and fellow road traveler well-being

Quote Source:  Sysco Sustainability Report 2013

http://sustainability.sysco.com/operating-sustainably/moving-products/

Never Leaves the State – Do I Need a USDOT Number?

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A carrier who picks up product at the airport and never leaves their state asks, Do I Need a USDOT Number?

dotnumbersvanThe answer is yes.  As an added plus you, as a carrier, will be guided to set standards for yourself and your team which help make your participation in the marketplace more successful.  How?  You drivers and products will get from A to B more often, without injury or accident injuring others.

Companies operating commercial vehicles which transport passengers or haul cargo in interstate commerce must be registered with the FMCSA and must have a USDOT Number. Also, commercial intrastate hazardous materials carriers who haul quantities requiring a safety permit must register for a USDOT Number.

The USDOT Number serves as a unique identifier when collecting and monitoring a company’s safety information acquired during audits, compliance reviews, crash investigations, and inspections.

I am still not clear about why I need to  Register for a  US DOT Number?

You are required to obtain a USDOT number if you have a vehicle that . . .

  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating, or gross vehicle weight or gross combination weight, of 4,536 kg (10,001 pounds) or more, whichever is greater; or
  • Is designed or used to transport more than 8 passengers (including the driver) for compensation; orstraighttruckdotnumber
  • Is designed or used to transport more than 15 passengers, including the driver, and is not used to transport passengers for compensation; or
  • Is used in transporting material found by the Secretary of Transportation to be hazardous and transported in a quantity requiring placarding.

AND is involved in Interstate commerce:

Trade, traffic, or transportation in the United States—

  • Between a place in a State and a place outside of such State (including a place outside of the United States);
  • Between two places in a State through another State or a place outside of the United States; or
  • Between two places in a State as part of trade, traffic, or transportation originating or terminating outside the State or the United States.  

If you answered ‘yes’ to any of the above in both the green and orange/red areas, you are a carrier who is required by FMCSA to obtain US DOT Number.

DOTFleets Note:

Some carriers think they are not required to register for a DOT number because their trucks only pick up product at the airport and deliver only within the their state, intrastate carriers.  However, if they pick up product that originated outside of their state they are INTERSTATE CARRIERS according to the last provision in red

Still confused?  Call up your local state DOT office and ask this simple question, “If I pick up interstate product at the airport and my trucks are alway within our state, am I required to register for a DOT number?

How to Comply with Federal Regulations

It is the responsibility of motor carrier operators and drivers to know and comply with all applicable Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. Safety compliance and safe operations translate into saved lives and property.  We believe the information in this package, when effectively applied, will contribute to safer motor carrier operations and highways.

Some States Require Carriers Register With DOT Number 
Click Here to see if your state is on of them.

 

Trianing – HOS – Two Day Trips – 10 Consecutive Hours Off-Duty

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Make sure your drivers are trained to keep their Hours of Service logs up to-date and understand how to stay in compliance with 10 off duty – not more than 11 hrs driving – not more than 14 hrs on duty..

If the HOS Log is being kept up to-date, the driver will recognize the 10 consecutive hour off-duty problem ahead of time and contact the company for alternate plans to stay in compliance and an alert, safe driver.

Remember: Fatigue is the killer, not the the HOS regulations.

Don’t let this happen to you.10hoursexampleoffduty-thumb.jpg

Drivers Take Note: Left Lane is for Passing: Now Florida Law

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Hat TIp: Wesley Chapel Community.Com

I got a call from a person driving behind one of our trucks today.  They told me our driver was driving along as he pleased in the ‘passing lane’  without consideration for those who wanted to pass behind him.  He called us as a courtesy to inform that this is now against the law to simply drive to your destination in the left most lane.  He was calling from the FL Turnpike.   I searched and this is what I found . . .  the caller was correct. Drivers who stay in the passing lane too long may be trolling for a traffic ticket.  

Driving below the speed of traffic in the left hand lane of any multi-lane road in Florida is not only annoying, it is now illegal thanks to 2014 revisions to Florida’s Laws.

According to the newly revised Florida State Statute 316.081, “a driver may not continue to operate a motor vehicle in the furthermost left-hand lane if the driver knows or reasonably should know that he or she is being overtaken in that lane from the rear by a motor vehicle traveling at a higher rate of speed.”

What is the cost for such a violation?  In Pasco County it will cost violators $164 and three points on their driver license if ticketed. To be reasonable the law has two common sense exemptions where one may continue to drive in the left lane for a short period of time.

  1. You are not required to move over to be passed if you are passing someone yourself.
  2. You are not required to move over to be passed if you are about to make a left hand turn at a nearby intersection.

Short of those exemptions, it is now illegal to continually drive in the left lane when others are behind you.  If approached from behind (regardless of speed) you must move over and allow other’s to pass you.

Experts in traffic and transportation say that if followed, this law will significantly reduce road rage issues, and allow for more efficient travel for all. Public awareness is the key to success

Gaps Eat Ankles and Legs

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LetYummyYummyGapTruckEveryone is late and you are already late for the next thing you had to do 30 minutes ago.  You’ve backed up to the dock and danged if you have time to mess with the ramp.  So you maneuver  and have the forklift guy snatch the pallet as you’ve done a 1000 times before . . . UNTIL . . . you slip and step into the gap.  NOW YOUR ARE REALLY GOING TO BE LATE.

The fall protection standard, at 29 CFR §1926.500(b), defines a hole as “a gap or void 2 inches…or more in its least dimension, in a floor, roof, or other walking/working surface.” The standard has two requirements with respect to holes. §1926.501(b)(4)(ii) requires that employees be protected from tripping or stepping into holes by placing covers over them. This provision does not specify a minimum depth for the requirement to apply. [click here]

QUESTION

What would you do to prevent this?  Policy?  Training? Go fill out some forms?  Have a meeting?  Take care to the guy and keep the product moving, the rest will take care of itself?

Carrier Monitoring DOT Safety Measurements

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English: Antique New Hampshire speed limit sig...

English: Antique New Hampshire speed limit sign. On display at Clark’s Trading Post, Lincoln New Hampshire. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

First:  Carriers need to set the standard and manage safety habits of ‘their drivers and the trucks they drive.  In an ideal world, the concern for others well-being can  inspire companies to create a safety culture for the drivers and their habits.

Note Well:   If your company is distracted from acting on your commitment to  public and employee safety, the DOT is determined to help remind you.  If you are really sloppy about your road safety, you could be looking for a new line of work.

Carrier management would be wise to go to http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/ and enter their DOT# .

DOT Safety Measurement Site

Once your enter your DOT# you will see how the Department of Transportation sees you, the Carrier.   and you will understand how much of a regulatory burden may be on your horizon or patting on the back . . . is due.

You will also be able to see the kind of citations your company has received, whether or not your drivers have turned in citations received during road inspections.

If you DOT# has passed the 65th percentile, your company is subject to the possibility of a field audit at any time from the DOT.  The carrier below has passed the 65% percentile because of three (3 ) citations.

Interpreting DOT Safety Measurement Emphesis Hand Held

Two (2) citations:  Driver was caught using a hand-held cellular phone while driving.

One (1) citation:  Driver was speeding 11-14 miles over the posted speed limit.

Both are heavily weighted.

Your take-away for making it this far:

Monitoring your DOT# Safety Measurement at http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/    you can take corrective action, even if the citation ( s ) were not reported by your drivers.

Recommendation:  By monitor your DOT# at    http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/sms/  quarterly or more frequently you company’s health is more assured.

Chain Cigar Smoking and Monthly Fleet Summaries

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1. F2 appears to be under-utilized and F3 is taking the larger burden of ware and tare.  Consider intentionally distributing more deliveries to F2.

2. F2 and F3 are being driven at speeds in access of 80 mph.  Consider allowing our dealer to program an upper limit for speed in the low 70’s.

  • Driven at speeds in access of 80 mph would in these vehicles assures little to no control with emergency breaking or steering. *

3. T8 and T9 are idling 3 to 4 times more than the other delivery vehicles.  Consider:

  • costs to driver and company due to increased exposure to theft/robbery. A sitting target in an out of the way place is an easy hit.

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  • cost of increased frequency of repairs to truck’s engine and regeneration system (decreasing it’s  designed productive life and increasing the likely hood of increased down time for repairs later and replacement rentals).

If prolonged idling is an essential aspect of delivery services, I recommend distributing them across the fleet, if possible. dlb

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Long idle times for our delivery trucks is equivalent to chain  cigar smoking for humans.  dlb

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