Drivers Pocket Guide  HOS Hours of Service

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Long-Haul Provision

Drivers of property-carrying CMVs which do not require a Commercial Driver’s License for operation and who operate beyond a 150 air-mile radius of their normal work reporting location:

  • May drive a maximum of 11 hours after 10 consecutive hours off duty.
  • May not drive beyond the 14th hour after coming on duty, following 10 consecutive hours off duty.
  • These operations must continue to comply with the hours-of-service limitations specified in 49 CFR 395.5.

Short-Haul Provision

Drivers of property-carrying CMVs which do not require a Commercial Driver’s License for operation and who operate within a 150 air-mile radius of their normal work reporting location:

  • May drive a maximum of 11 hours after coming on duty following 10 or more consecutive hours off duty.
  • Are not required to keep records-of-duty status (RODS).

Employer must:

  • Maintain and retain accurate time records for a period of 6 months showing the time the duty period began, ended, and total hours on duty each day in place of RODS.

Drivers who use the above-described Short-haul provision are not eligible to use 100 Air-mile provision 395.1(e)

§395.1 Scope of rules in this part.

(b) Adverse driving conditions. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (h)(2) of this section, a driver who encounters adverse driving conditions, as defined in § 395.2,

    • 395.2 Definitions:
    • Adverse driving conditions means snow, sleet, fog, other adverse weather conditions, a highway covered with snow or ice, or unusual road and traffic conditions, none of which were apparent on the basis of information known to the person dispatching the run at the time it was begun.

(b)(2) Emergency conditions. In case of any emergency, a driver may complete his/her run without being in violation of the provisions of the regulations in this part, if such run reasonably could have been completed absent the emergency.

  • 390.5 Definitions
  • Emergency condition requiring immediate response means any condition that, if left unattended, is reasonably likely to result in immediate serious bodily harm, death, or substantial damage to property. In the case of transportation of propane winter heating fuel, such conditions shall include (but are not limited to) the detection of gas odor, the activation of carbon monoxide alarms, the detection of carbon monoxide poisoning, and any real or suspected damage to a propane gas system following a severe storm or flooding. An “emergency condition requiring immediate response” does not include requests to refill empty gas tanks. In the case of a pipeline emergency, such conditions include (but are not limited to) indication of an abnormal pressure event, leak, release or rupture.

 

 

The Revised Regulations 2005 Drivers Pocket Guide – Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

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