Hours-of-Service Logbook Examples

Download PDF Version of:  Driver’s Daily Log

Each blue horizontal line drawn within each log grid is labeled with the number of consecutive hours the driver spent in that duty status:

Log grid close-up

 

Finally, an arrow labeled “CP” is used to indicate various “Calculation Points,” such as “CP#1,” “CP#2,” etc. A calculation point is the time of day at which a driver of a property-carrying CMV would begin to count his or her driving and/or on-duty time so as to calculate compliance with the driving and/or on-duty limits. A calculation point would normally appear after a 10-hour break or equivalent:

Log grid close-up

When reviewing the following examples, you can assume that the driver had at least 10 consecutive hours off duty before the start of each “Day 1” or standalone log.

The examples are divided into two sets: some for drivers of property-carrying vehicles and some for drivers of passenger-carrying vehicles.

For more information on the hours-of-service rules or how to complete a log, refer to the Interstate Truck Driver’s Guide to Hours of Service or the Interstate Motorcoach Driver’s Guide to Hours of Service.

NOTE: The following log examples focus on the 11- and 14-hour rules for drivers of property-carrying CMVs and the 10-

Multiple stops means all stops made in any one village, town, or city may be computed as one.

Property-Carrying Vehicles

Logging Example #A

Completed log grid

Violations: There are no violations.

Explanation — 11-Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours beginning at 4:00 a.m. (CP#1). The driver drove only 6 hours, within the limit.

Explanation — 14-Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available beginning at 4:00 a.m. (CP#1). The driver stopped driving a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) upon reaching the 14-hour limit at 6:00 p.m., so there are no violations.

NOTE: You may continue to work and/or drive a non-commercial motor vehicle after reaching the 14-hour limit, as long as you do not drive a CMV. After 6:00 p.m., this driver would need 10 consecutive hours off duty before again driving a CMV.

Logging Example #B

Completed log grid

Violations: There is a 14-hour rule violation from 9:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

Explanation — 11-Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours beginning at 2:00 a.m. (CP#1). The driver drove for just 1 hour.

Explanation — 14-Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available beginning at 2:00 a.m. (CP#1). Because the 14-hour calculation includes all off-duty time of less than 10 consecutive hours, all of this driver’s time between 2:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. is included in the calculation. The driver reached the 14-hour limit at 4:00 p.m. and violated the 14-hour rule at 9:00 p.m. by driving a CMV past the 14-hour duty limit.

NOTE: Even though this driver had 10 hours off duty during the day and only drove for 1 hour, that hour of driving was done in violation of the 14-hour rule. The driver did not obtain another 10 consecutive hours off duty, so the calculation point does not change and the 9-hour break must be included in the calculation of the 14-hour limit. After 10:00 p.m., the driver must be off duty for at least 10 consecutive hours, or in a sleeper berth for at least 8 consecutive hours, before driving again.

To remain in compliance: The driver should not have driven after 4:00 p.m., the 14-hour limit.

Download PDF Version of: | Driver’s Daily Log

Hours-of-Service Logbook Examples – Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

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